Before 1700 there was no systematic control over silver marking and it was only with Peter the Great that a "silver standard" was set and Assay Offices established in all major cities.

The standard for Russian silver is measured in zolotniks: the most common fineness is 84, corresponding to 875/1000 standard. There are also other standards that can be encountered, which include 88, 91, 94 and very rarely 96 (meaning pure silver).

Up to the late 19th century each silver item had to be marked, other than with the silver standard mark, also with town mark, Assay Master mark with date, and Maker’s mark.

pushkin antiques faberge

Faberge

pushkin antiques sazikov

Ignaty Sazikov

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Nicholls & Plincke

pushkin antiques FEODOR RUCKERT.jpg

Feodor Ruckert

pushkin antiques MARIA SEMENOVA.jpg

Maria Semenova

pushkin antiques adler.jpg

Andre Carlovich Adler

Michael Perkin

Michael Perkhin

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Bolin

pushkin antiques kolin

Erik Kolin

pushkin antiques pavel ovchinnikov.jpg

Pavel Ovchinnikov

pushkin antiques Julius Rappoport.jpg

Julius Rappoport

pushkin antiques Andrei Bragin.jpg

Andrei Bragin

pushkin antiques henrik wigstrom.jpg

Henrik Wigstrom

pushkin antiques keibel

Keibel

pushkin antiques ivan KHLEBNIKOV

Ivan Khlebnikov

pushkin antiques Wakeva.jpg

Wakeva

pushkin antiques artels.jpg

Artels

pushkin antiques IVAN SALTYKOV.jpg

Ivan Saltykov

pushkin antiques GUSTAV KLINGERT.jpg

Gustav Klingert

pushkin antiques albert holmstrom.jpg

Albert Holmstrom

pushkin antiques britzin

Ivan Britzin

pushkin antiques Nemirov-Kolodkin.jpg

Nemirov-Kolodkin

pushkin antiques Grachev brothers.jpg

Grachev Brothers

pushkin antiques Mikhail Zorin.jpg

Mikhail Zorin